July 11, 2017

[White Paper] Cut Through Digital Ad Clutter with Physical Impressions

Bringing-programmatic-home

Digital marketing has become a race to the bottom for marketers and consumers alike. As marketing tactics have become more aggressive and less effective, brands are pulling back on digital advertising budget.

P&G’s Marc Pritchard is an outspoken critic on the current transparency and efficiency issues with digital. He and other advertising giants are putting their money where their mouths are by reducing digital ad spend in a big way. As Business Insider reported at the end of June, P&G dropped their digital ad spend by 41% year-over-year, and Unilever’s spend dropped by 59% from January to May 2017.

Even Google is jumping into the fray by cracking down hard on sites with intrusive, spammy advertising that detracts from the user experience.

While the problems with digital continue to grow, direct mail remains a powerful way to reach consumers:

  • 67% feel mail is more personal than the Internet
  • 90% of Millennials think this form of advertising is reliable
  • The response rate of direct mail is the highest of all contact channels — far ahead of any digital channel

Direct mail has its own set of unique challenges, however. It’s difficult for marketers to harness this effectiveness at scale, and direct mail lacks the data-driven targeting and optimization capabilities that programmatic advertising offers.

Programmatic Direct Mail® brings the two channels together (without the pains of either). Brands are seeing big results from this newest channel since Search and Social. To break it down, we’re releasing a new white paper that shows you exactly why tangible media is so effective at breaking through the noise of digital advertising: “Bringing Programmatic Home: Why Physical Impressions Break Through Digital Ad Clutter.”

Get the free white paper here.

 

Source: USPS, “The Mail Moment,” 2016; USPS, “Still Relevant: A Look at How Millennials Respond to Direct Mail,” 2017; The DMA, “Response Rate Report,” 2016.

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